Kids are playing on hoodoos near Drumheller, Alberta. The word hoodoos comes from the Hausa language of West Africa for hu’du’ba, which means to “arouse resentment produce retribution.”

Kids are playing on hoodoos near Drumheller, Alberta. The word hoodoos comes from the Hausa language of West Africa for hu’du’ba, which means to “arouse resentment produce retribution.”

  Hoodoos are formed over time when a solid rock is capping and protecting, from the natural weathering process of erosion, more friable material deposited below. 

 Hoodoos are formed over time when a solid rock is capping and protecting, from the natural weathering process of erosion, more friable material deposited below. 

 Large natural hot springs like this one, near the town of Radium Hot Springs in the East Kootenay region of British Columbia, have been commercially developed through the years as resort destinations.

Large natural hot springs like this one, near the town of Radium Hot Springs in the East Kootenay region of British Columbia, have been commercially developed through the years as resort destinations.

 Less commercial hot springs are becoming increasingly popular among tourists seeking a greater connection with nature.

Less commercial hot springs are becoming increasingly popular among tourists seeking a greater connection with nature.

 Transported by glaciers over 400 km from were it was originally deposited, the estimated 16,500-ton boulder named "Big Rock" or "Okotoks", near the town of the same name, is the largest known glacial erratic in the world.

Transported by glaciers over 400 km from were it was originally deposited, the estimated 16,500-ton boulder named "Big Rock" or "Okotoks", near the town of the same name, is the largest known glacial erratic in the world.

 A climber exercises on an erratic block in a residential area in Calgary, Alberta. This glacial erratic is found along what is known as the "Foothills Erratics Train", a 20km-wide corridor that stretches from Jasper to northern Montana, and is a proof of the glacier movement in western Canada during the last Ice Age, some 12,000 years ago.

A climber exercises on an erratic block in a residential area in Calgary, Alberta. This glacial erratic is found along what is known as the "Foothills Erratics Train", a 20km-wide corridor that stretches from Jasper to northern Montana, and is a proof of the glacier movement in western Canada during the last Ice Age, some 12,000 years ago.

 Tourists pose by one of many cold mineral springs nicknamed “paint pots", in Kootenay National Park, BC. Those springs are formed by the accumulation of iron-oxide rich minerals that precipitate around the outer portion and cause them to deepen with time and have their unique orange color.

Tourists pose by one of many cold mineral springs nicknamed “paint pots", in Kootenay National Park, BC. Those springs are formed by the accumulation of iron-oxide rich minerals that precipitate around the outer portion and cause them to deepen with time and have their unique orange color.

  Hikers walks by dozens of meters of unconsolidated glacial debris on route to the Athabasca Glacier near Jasper, Alberta. Those layers of unconsolidated debris ranging in size from fine sands to meter size boulders are known as "moraine". They are usually formed at the top of a glacier and deposited as the glacier is melting or retreating.

 Hikers walks by dozens of meters of unconsolidated glacial debris on route to the Athabasca Glacier near Jasper, Alberta. Those layers of unconsolidated debris ranging in size from fine sands to meter size boulders are known as "moraine". They are usually formed at the top of a glacier and deposited as the glacier is melting or retreating.

  For the past 125 years, the Athabasca Glacier, the most-visited glacier in North America, has been shrinking to half of its volume and retreating for more than 1.5 km. The glacier retreats at an average rate of 5 to 6 meters every year. 

 For the past 125 years, the Athabasca Glacier, the most-visited glacier in North America, has been shrinking to half of its volume and retreating for more than 1.5 km. The glacier retreats at an average rate of 5 to 6 meters every year. 

 Kids are playing on hoodoos near Drumheller, Alberta. The word hoodoos comes from the Hausa language of West Africa for hu’du’ba, which means to “arouse resentment produce retribution.”
  Hoodoos are formed over time when a solid rock is capping and protecting, from the natural weathering process of erosion, more friable material deposited below. 
 Large natural hot springs like this one, near the town of Radium Hot Springs in the East Kootenay region of British Columbia, have been commercially developed through the years as resort destinations.
 Less commercial hot springs are becoming increasingly popular among tourists seeking a greater connection with nature.
 Transported by glaciers over 400 km from were it was originally deposited, the estimated 16,500-ton boulder named "Big Rock" or "Okotoks", near the town of the same name, is the largest known glacial erratic in the world.
 A climber exercises on an erratic block in a residential area in Calgary, Alberta. This glacial erratic is found along what is known as the "Foothills Erratics Train", a 20km-wide corridor that stretches from Jasper to northern Montana, and is a proof of the glacier movement in western Canada during the last Ice Age, some 12,000 years ago.
 Tourists pose by one of many cold mineral springs nicknamed “paint pots", in Kootenay National Park, BC. Those springs are formed by the accumulation of iron-oxide rich minerals that precipitate around the outer portion and cause them to deepen with time and have their unique orange color.
  Hikers walks by dozens of meters of unconsolidated glacial debris on route to the Athabasca Glacier near Jasper, Alberta. Those layers of unconsolidated debris ranging in size from fine sands to meter size boulders are known as "moraine". They are usually formed at the top of a glacier and deposited as the glacier is melting or retreating.
  For the past 125 years, the Athabasca Glacier, the most-visited glacier in North America, has been shrinking to half of its volume and retreating for more than 1.5 km. The glacier retreats at an average rate of 5 to 6 meters every year. 

Kids are playing on hoodoos near Drumheller, Alberta. The word hoodoos comes from the Hausa language of West Africa for hu’du’ba, which means to “arouse resentment produce retribution.”

 Hoodoos are formed over time when a solid rock is capping and protecting, from the natural weathering process of erosion, more friable material deposited below. 

Large natural hot springs like this one, near the town of Radium Hot Springs in the East Kootenay region of British Columbia, have been commercially developed through the years as resort destinations.

Less commercial hot springs are becoming increasingly popular among tourists seeking a greater connection with nature.

Transported by glaciers over 400 km from were it was originally deposited, the estimated 16,500-ton boulder named "Big Rock" or "Okotoks", near the town of the same name, is the largest known glacial erratic in the world.

A climber exercises on an erratic block in a residential area in Calgary, Alberta. This glacial erratic is found along what is known as the "Foothills Erratics Train", a 20km-wide corridor that stretches from Jasper to northern Montana, and is a proof of the glacier movement in western Canada during the last Ice Age, some 12,000 years ago.

Tourists pose by one of many cold mineral springs nicknamed “paint pots", in Kootenay National Park, BC. Those springs are formed by the accumulation of iron-oxide rich minerals that precipitate around the outer portion and cause them to deepen with time and have their unique orange color.

 Hikers walks by dozens of meters of unconsolidated glacial debris on route to the Athabasca Glacier near Jasper, Alberta. Those layers of unconsolidated debris ranging in size from fine sands to meter size boulders are known as "moraine". They are usually formed at the top of a glacier and deposited as the glacier is melting or retreating.

 For the past 125 years, the Athabasca Glacier, the most-visited glacier in North America, has been shrinking to half of its volume and retreating for more than 1.5 km. The glacier retreats at an average rate of 5 to 6 meters every year. 

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