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 Effie, 68, has been homeless and living at the hospital for several months. Her belongings are in storage and she is unsure as to where she will live when she gets out of hospital.

Effie, 68, has been homeless and living at the hospital for several months. Her belongings are in storage and she is unsure as to where she will live when she gets out of hospital.

 Effie's monthly pension is not enough to cover a $2000 rent, the only seniors housing options available to her in the city. Doctors keep a close eye on her health and keep monitoring a resolving pneumonia.   "I have no privacy here and nights can be very long. I can't wait to get out of here...but I have nowhere to go."

Effie's monthly pension is not enough to cover a $2000 rent, the only seniors housing options available to her in the city. Doctors keep a close eye on her health and keep monitoring a resolving pneumonia.

"I have no privacy here and nights can be very long. I can't wait to get out of here...but I have nowhere to go."

 Bill, 70, has been homeless for a few months now. He was recently evicted from the shack he was living in when his friend, the owner of the property, passed away suddenly. Now with no fixed address and fragile health, Bill’s future is uncertain.

Bill, 70, has been homeless for a few months now. He was recently evicted from the shack he was living in when his friend, the owner of the property, passed away suddenly. Now with no fixed address and fragile health, Bill’s future is uncertain.

 During the coldest months of the year, Bill managed to stay at a friend's house.

During the coldest months of the year, Bill managed to stay at a friend's house.

 The Elders Caring Shelter in Grande Prairie, run by the Metis Nation of Alberta, has a vision to provide safe and affordable housing to homeless seniors. However, with a full house of 17 occupants and a waiting list of more than 40 applicants, the shelter is unable to accommodate the growing seniors population looking for affordable housing in the city.

The Elders Caring Shelter in Grande Prairie, run by the Metis Nation of Alberta, has a vision to provide safe and affordable housing to homeless seniors. However, with a full house of 17 occupants and a waiting list of more than 40 applicants, the shelter is unable to accommodate the growing seniors population looking for affordable housing in the city.

 Daryl, 63, poses at the Elders Caring Shelter in Grande Prairie, Alberta.   "After being laid off I struggled financially and it was hard psychologically. This place has relieved a lot of stress in my life; my stress level is way down. It allowed me to focus and helped me put my feet under me."

Daryl, 63, poses at the Elders Caring Shelter in Grande Prairie, Alberta.

"After being laid off I struggled financially and it was hard psychologically. This place has relieved a lot of stress in my life; my stress level is way down. It allowed me to focus and helped me put my feet under me."

  Les, 66, resident at the Elder's Shelter finds the shelter to be a really convenient, helpful, understanding and receptive place to be.     "I like the support and the companionship. It feels like you are not alone. It helps me emotionally and spiritually and I feel part of the society. You are not cast aside here."

Les, 66, resident at the Elder's Shelter finds the shelter to be a really convenient, helpful, understanding and receptive place to be. 

"I like the support and the companionship. It feels like you are not alone. It helps me emotionally and spiritually and I feel part of the society. You are not cast aside here."

 Bill keeps hoping that one day he will be able to find a place he can afford and call home. In the meantime, he and his two dogs often drive in the city to scope out any potential low income rentals.

Bill keeps hoping that one day he will be able to find a place he can afford and call home. In the meantime, he and his two dogs often drive in the city to scope out any potential low income rentals.

 Effie has been put on a waiting list to be transferred to an affordable senior’s home. Still living at the hospital and visiting it's faith center, she has no idea when and where space will become available. No matter what happens, she believes God will take good care of her.

Effie has been put on a waiting list to be transferred to an affordable senior’s home. Still living at the hospital and visiting it's faith center, she has no idea when and where space will become available. No matter what happens, she believes God will take good care of her.

01_1_Silent-Boomers__ABC1947C_Web.jpg
Over-60-and-hidden-homeless_intro-sheet_v2.jpg
 Effie, 68, has been homeless and living at the hospital for several months. Her belongings are in storage and she is unsure as to where she will live when she gets out of hospital.
 Effie's monthly pension is not enough to cover a $2000 rent, the only seniors housing options available to her in the city. Doctors keep a close eye on her health and keep monitoring a resolving pneumonia.   "I have no privacy here and nights can be very long. I can't wait to get out of here...but I have nowhere to go."
 Bill, 70, has been homeless for a few months now. He was recently evicted from the shack he was living in when his friend, the owner of the property, passed away suddenly. Now with no fixed address and fragile health, Bill’s future is uncertain.
 During the coldest months of the year, Bill managed to stay at a friend's house.
 The Elders Caring Shelter in Grande Prairie, run by the Metis Nation of Alberta, has a vision to provide safe and affordable housing to homeless seniors. However, with a full house of 17 occupants and a waiting list of more than 40 applicants, the shelter is unable to accommodate the growing seniors population looking for affordable housing in the city.
 Daryl, 63, poses at the Elders Caring Shelter in Grande Prairie, Alberta.   "After being laid off I struggled financially and it was hard psychologically. This place has relieved a lot of stress in my life; my stress level is way down. It allowed me to focus and helped me put my feet under me."
  Les, 66, resident at the Elder's Shelter finds the shelter to be a really convenient, helpful, understanding and receptive place to be.     "I like the support and the companionship. It feels like you are not alone. It helps me emotionally and spiritually and I feel part of the society. You are not cast aside here."
 Bill keeps hoping that one day he will be able to find a place he can afford and call home. In the meantime, he and his two dogs often drive in the city to scope out any potential low income rentals.
 Effie has been put on a waiting list to be transferred to an affordable senior’s home. Still living at the hospital and visiting it's faith center, she has no idea when and where space will become available. No matter what happens, she believes God will take good care of her.

Effie, 68, has been homeless and living at the hospital for several months. Her belongings are in storage and she is unsure as to where she will live when she gets out of hospital.

Effie's monthly pension is not enough to cover a $2000 rent, the only seniors housing options available to her in the city. Doctors keep a close eye on her health and keep monitoring a resolving pneumonia.

"I have no privacy here and nights can be very long. I can't wait to get out of here...but I have nowhere to go."

Bill, 70, has been homeless for a few months now. He was recently evicted from the shack he was living in when his friend, the owner of the property, passed away suddenly. Now with no fixed address and fragile health, Bill’s future is uncertain.

During the coldest months of the year, Bill managed to stay at a friend's house.

The Elders Caring Shelter in Grande Prairie, run by the Metis Nation of Alberta, has a vision to provide safe and affordable housing to homeless seniors. However, with a full house of 17 occupants and a waiting list of more than 40 applicants, the shelter is unable to accommodate the growing seniors population looking for affordable housing in the city.

Daryl, 63, poses at the Elders Caring Shelter in Grande Prairie, Alberta.

"After being laid off I struggled financially and it was hard psychologically. This place has relieved a lot of stress in my life; my stress level is way down. It allowed me to focus and helped me put my feet under me."

Les, 66, resident at the Elder's Shelter finds the shelter to be a really convenient, helpful, understanding and receptive place to be. 

"I like the support and the companionship. It feels like you are not alone. It helps me emotionally and spiritually and I feel part of the society. You are not cast aside here."

Bill keeps hoping that one day he will be able to find a place he can afford and call home. In the meantime, he and his two dogs often drive in the city to scope out any potential low income rentals.

Effie has been put on a waiting list to be transferred to an affordable senior’s home. Still living at the hospital and visiting it's faith center, she has no idea when and where space will become available. No matter what happens, she believes God will take good care of her.

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